A. W. Pink – The Love of God to Us

By ‘us’ we mean His people. Although we read of the love which is in Christ Jesus our Lord’ (Rom 8:39), Holy Writ knows nothing of a love of God outside of Christ. ‘The LORD is good to all: and His tender mercies are over all His works’ (Psa 145:9), so that He provides the ravens with food. ‘He is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil’ (Luke 6:35), and His providence ministers unto the just and the unjust (Matt 5:45). But His love is reserved for His elect. That is unequivocally established by its characteristics, for the attributes of His love are identical with Himself. Necessarily so, for ‘God is love.’ In making that postulate it is but another way to say God’s love is like Himself, from everlasting to everlasting–immutable. Nothing is more absurd than to imagine that anyone beloved of God can eternally perish or shall ever experience His everlasting vengeance. Since the love of God is ‘in Christ Jesus,’ it was attracted by nothing in its objects, nor can it be repelled by anything in, of, or by them. ‘Having loved His own which were in the world, He loved them unto the end’ (John 13:1). The ‘world’ in John 3:16 is a general term used in contrast with the Jews, and the verse must be interpreted so as not to contradict Psalms 5:5; 6:7; John 3:36; Romans 9:13.

The chief design of God is to commend the love of God in Christ, for He is the sole channel through which it flows. The Son has not induced the Father to love His people, but rather was it His love for them which moved Him to give His Son for them. Ralph Erskine said:

‘God hath taken a marvelous way to manifest His love. When He would show His power, He makes a world. When He would display His wisdom, He puts it in a frame and form that discovers its vastness. When He would manifest the grandeur and glory of His name, He makes a heaven, and puts angels and archangels, principalities and powers therein. And when He would manifest His love, what will He not do? God hath taken a great and marvelous way of manifesting it in Christ: His person, His blood, His death, His righteousness.’

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – Repentance: What Saith the Scriptures?

Introduction

One of the Divinely predicted characteristics of the “perilous times” in which we are now living is that “evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving, and being deceived” (2 Tim. 3:13). The deeper reference of these words is to spiritual seducers and deceivers. Men with captivating personalities, men who occupy a prominent place in Christendom, men with an apparently deep reverence for Holy Writ, are beguiling souls with fatal error. Not only are evolutionists, higher critics and modernists deluding multitudes of our young people with their sugar-coated lies, but some who pose as the champions of orthodoxy and boast of their ability to “rightly divide the Word of truth” are poisoning the minds of many to their eternal destruction.

Such a charge as we have just made is indeed a serious one, and one which is not to be readily received without proof. But proof is easily furnished. The Word of God teaches plainly that in this dispensation, equally with preceding ones, God requires a deep and sincere repentance before He pardons any sinner. Repentance is absolutely necessary to salvation, just as necessary as is faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. “Except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish” (Luke 13:3). “Then hath God also to the Gentiles granted repentance unto life” (Acts 11:18). “For godly sorrow worketh repentance, not to be repented of” (2 Cor. 7:10). It is impossible to frame language more explicit than that. Therefore, in view of these verses, and others yet to be quoted, we cannot but sorrowfully regard those who are now affirming that repentance is not, in this dispensation, essential unto salvation, as being deceivers of souls, blind leaders of the blind.

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – The Mediation of Christ

For there is one God, and one Mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim 2:5). Some unregenerate men, who deny the God-head of Christ, imagine they find something in this verse which supports their system of infidelity, but this only serves to make the more evident the fearful blindness of their minds. As well might they reason from Galatians 1:1 (where we read, “Paul, an apostle, not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ”), that the Lord Jesus is not Man, as to infer from 1 Timothy 2:5 that He is not God. As we shall show in what follows, none could possibly heal the breach between God and men save one who partook of each of their natures.

“For there is one God, and one Mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Tim 2:5). “In that great difference between God and men, occasioned by our sin and apostasy from Him, which of itself could issue in nothing but the utter ruin of the whole race of mankind, there was none in heaven or earth, in their original nature and operations, who was meet or able to make up a peace between them. Yet this must be done by a mediator, or cease forever. This mediator could not be God Himself absolutely considered, for ‘a mediator is not of one, but God is one’ (Gal 3:20). And as for creatures, there was none in heaven or earth, there was none meet to undertake this office. ‘For if one man sin against another, the judge shall judge him; but if a man sin against the Lord, who shall intreat for him?’ (1 Sam 2:25)” (John Owen, 1616-1683).

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – Salvation from the Pleasure of Sin

It is here that God begins His actual application of salvation unto His elect. God saves us from the pleasure or love of sin before He delivers us from the penalty or punishment of sin. Necessarily so, for it would be neither an act of holiness nor of righteousness were He to grant full pardon to one who was still a rebel against Him, loving that which He hates. God is a God of order throughout, and nothing ever more evidences the perfections of His works than the orderliness of them. And how does God save His people from the pleasure of sin? The answer is, “By imparting to them a nature which hates evil and loves holiness.” This takes place when they are born again, so that actual salvation begins with regeneration. Of course it does: where else could it commence? Fallen man can never perceive his desperate need of salvation nor come to Christ for it, till he has been renewed by the Holy Spirit.

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – The Wrath of God

It is sad indeed, to find so many professing Christians who appear to regard the wrath of God as something for which they need to make an apology—or who at least wish there were no such thing. While some who would not go so far as to openly admit that they consider it a blemish on the divine character, yet they are far from regarding it with delight. They do not like to think about it, and they rarely hear it mentioned, without a secret resentment rising up in their hearts against it. Even with those who are more sober in their judgment, not a few seem to imagine that there is a severity about the divine wrath, which makes it too terrifying to form a theme for profitable contemplation. Others harbor the delusion that God’s wrath is not consistent with His goodness, and so seek to banish it from their thoughts!

Yes, many there are who turn away from a vision of God’s wrath, as though they were called to look upon some blotch in the divine character or some blot upon the divine government. But what says the Scriptures? As we turn to them we find that God has made no attempt to conceal the facts concerning His wrath. He is not ashamed to make it known that vengeance and fury belong unto Him. His own challenge is:

“Look now; I myself am He! There is no god other than Me! I am the one who kills and gives life; I am the one who wounds and heals; no one delivers from My power! Now I raise My hand to heaven and declare, “As surely as I live, when I sharpen My flashing sword and begin to carry out justice, I will bring vengeance on My enemies and repay those who hate Me. I will make My arrows drunk with blood, and My sword will devour flesh!” (Deut 32:39-42).

To read the rest of A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – The Believer’s Paradox

Introduction

This was the honest confession of one whose faith had been put to a most severe test. It issued from a man who had a son possessed by a demon, which grievously tormented him: “wheresoever he taketh him, he teareth him: and he foameth, and gnasheth with his teeth, and pineth away” (Mar 9:18). What a sore trial was that for a tender parent! How thankful you should be, my reader, if in the sovereignty of God you are blest with normal and healthy children; and how sympathetic we should be toward those who have afflicted ones! No doubt this man had consulted different physicians, and perhaps had conferred with his pastor; but no relief had been obtained. What a testing of his submission to the will of God! Then he sought aid from Christ’s disciples, but they had been unable to effect any cure, and “hope deferred maketh the heart sick” (Prov. 13:12). Such, in brief, is the background of our text.

And now the great Physician commanded that the tormented one should be brought to Him, but we read “And when he saw him, straightway the spirit tare him; and he fell on the ground, and wallowed foaming” (v. 20). Yes, matters generally seem to get worse with us when the Lord begins to take us in hand—to demonstrate that our extremity is God’s opportunity to manifest His sufficiency. It was thus with the afflicted Hebrews in Egypt. The darkest hour precedes the dawn. But what a tremendous testing of this man’s faith to behold his poor son foaming in agony at the Saviour’s feet! “And He asked his father, How long is it ago since this came unto him? And he said, Of a child. And ofttimes it hath cast him into the fire, and into the waters, to destroy him: but if thou canst do anything, have compassion on us, and help us” (vv. 21, 22). Did the Lord Jesus indignantly rebuke him for questioning His power, and turn away in disgust? No, for “great is his mercy”(Ps. 103:11). Instead, He answered, “If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” (v. 23), and we are told “And straightway the father of the child cried out, and said with tears, Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief.”

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – Fatherhood: Responsibility and Privilege

One of the saddest and most tragic features of our twentieth-century1 “civilization” is the awful prevalence of disobedience on the part of children to their parents during the days of childhood and their lack of reverence and respect when they grow up. This is evidenced in many ways and is general, alas, even in the families of professing Christians. In his extensive travels during the past thirty years, the writer has sojourned in a great many homes. The piety and beauty of some of them remain as sacred and fragrant memories, but others of them have left the most painful impressions. Children who are self-willed or spoiled not only bring themselves into perpetual unhappiness but also inflict discomfort upon all who come into contact with them. [They] augur, by their conduct, evil things for the days to come.

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s article, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – The Holy Spirit

In the past, having given consideration to the attributes of God our Father, and then to a contemplation of some of the glories of God our Redeemer, it now seems fitting that these should be followed by this series on the Holy Spirit. The need for this is real and pressing, for ignorance of the Third Person of the Godhead is most dishonoring to Him and highly injurious to ourselves. The late George Smeaton of Scotland began his excellent work upon the Holy Spirit by saying,

Wherever Christianity has been a living power, the doctrine of the Holy Spirit has uniformly been regarded, equally with the Atonement and Justification by faith, as the article of a standing or falling church. The distinctive feature of Christianity as it addresses itself to man’s experience, is the work of the Spirit, which not only elevates it far above all philosophical speculation, but also above every other form of religion.

To continue reading A. W. Pink’s book, click here.

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – The Importance of Sanctification

What is “sanctification”? Is it a quality or position? Is sanctification a legal thing or an experimental? That is to say, “Is it something the believer has in Christ or in himself? Is it absolute or relative?” By which we mean, “Does it admit of degree or no? Is it unchanging or progressive?” Are we sanctified at the time we are justified, or is sanctification a later blessing? How is this blessing obtained? By something that is done for us, or by us, or both? How may one be assured he has been sanctified: what are the characteristics, the evidences, the fruits?…Are sanctification and purification the same thing? Does sanctification relate to the soul, the body, or both? What position does sanctification occupy in the order of Divine blessings? What is the connection between regeneration and sanctification? What is the relation between justification and sanctification?…Exactly what is the place of sanctification regarding salvation: does it precede or follow, or is it an integral part of it? Why is there so much diversity of opinion upon these points, scarcely any two writers treating of this subject in the same manner? Our purpose here is not simply to multiply questions but to indicate the many-sidedness of our present theme.

The great importance of our present theme is evidenced by the prominence that is given to it in Scripture: the words holy, sanctified, etc., occurring therein hundreds of times. Its importance also appears from the high value ascribed to it: it is the supreme glory of God, of the unfallen angels, of the Church. In Exodus 15:11, we read that the Lord God is “glorious in holiness” —that is His crowning excellency. In Matthew 25:31, mention is made of the “holy angels,” for no higher honor can be ascribed them. In Ephesians 5:26-27, we learn that the Church’s glory lieth not in pomp and outward adornment, but in holiness. Its importance further appears in that this is the aim in all God’s dispensations.2 He elected His people that they should be “holy” (Eph. 1:4); Christ died that He might “sanctify” His people (Heb 13:12); chastisements3 are sent that we might be “partakers of God’s holiness” (Heb 12:10).

Continue Reading

Please follow and like us:
0

A. W. Pink – What is Sin?

What is sin? Ah, what man is capable of supplying an adequate answer: “Who can understand his errors?” (Ps 19:12). A volume might be written thereon and still much be left unsaid. Only the One against Whom it is committed can fully understand its nature or measure its enormity. And yet, from the light that God has furnished us, a partial answer at least can be gathered. For example, we read in 1 John 3:4, “Sin is the transgression of the law”; and that such transgression is not confined to the outward act is clear from “the thought of foolishness is sin” (Pro 24:9). But what is meant by “sin is the transgression of the law”? It means that sin is a trampling upon God’s holy commandment. It is an act of defiance against the Lawgiver. [Because] the Law [is] “holy, and just, and good” (Rom. 7:12), it follows that any breach of it is an evil and enormity1 that God alone is capable of estimating.

Continue Reading

Please follow and like us:
0